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Author Topic: The Great White Whale Restoration  (Read 13560 times)

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2016, 07:00:07 am »
Thanks, Shawn! Your encouragement is greatly appreciated!

This technique is one that I picked up in Dental Lab. Although it is usually used for a lost wax method, I've used it on repairs and relines. :)

I still have some finishing to do and some refining on the tabs so they insert well into the secondary hull.

More to come and I grow more interested as I see the lines of the ship restored!

Thanks for reading!

Steve
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #31 on: January 27, 2016, 07:34:46 am »
Just a small update:

1. For the interior portion of the support mechanism, I took measurements of the Round2 interior support and then made a paper pattern. I purchased a thicker polystyrene sheet and then, tracing the pattern, cut it out.

2. I used a thicker Tamiya cement to glue the parts together. Because there was so much tape needed to hold it together, I had to glue from the inside. Once the inside glue set, I removed the tape and added more cement around the outside.

3. This is a test fitting and the plan. After I get the pylon tabs made (previous post) I can position these on the inside to the approximate angle.

4. This is another angle of the plan.

5. I have been considering what paint schema I was going to use and all of them required I get access to the warp nacelles – particularly the part underneath the Bussard Collectors. So I had to crack them off. The schema also calls for a different color for the Energy/Matter Matrix Restoration Cowls and I cracked them off, too. I figured since I had them all apart, I was take a pic of them for posterity.

6. Here is the Starboard Nacelle. I have done some shaping of the male pylon support. One looked too long and, when I measured it, it was. Better too long than too small and have nothing to reduce. :)

7. Here’s the pair with the tabs restored. I still have some fine finishing to do, but at least they fit inside the secondary hull again!

Once again, Thanks for Reading!

I look forward to your comments and input!

Steve
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

Offline Shawn McClure

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #32 on: January 27, 2016, 08:44:12 am »
I am so amazed at what you are doing.  I think 9 out of 10 of us would have thrown this thing in the trash.

Hang in there buddy, you are getting close.
To build or not to build.... that is the question.   The answer.... build... Duh.

Offline trekker9211

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2016, 08:40:57 am »
Clever fix Steve. Keep plugging along Brother! 8)
Phil

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #34 on: January 30, 2016, 07:02:12 am »
Thanks, guys, for the awesome support and encouragement! ;D

This is a relatively small update:

8. I did a dry test fit for the interior female portion of the pylon support mechanism. I put the model on its back and dry fit the primary build pieces together – I wanted to make sure the angles and alignment were close so I wouldn’t have issues to deal with later. The copper is for weight to ensure the Interconnecting Dorsal was resting on the saucer. Everything looked good so I glued them in place.

9. An exterior shot of the slot.

10. A shot with flash showing the bottom of the slot.

11. A ventral view showing the female portion cemented in place. They’re not perfectly sitting on the hull, but majority of the piece is and is stable enough for the next step.

12. I figured the female portion alone, as it was wouldn’t be able to stand up to the stresses placed on it by the pylons so I took some more Millput put a bead around the perimeter and tapered it toward the bottom of the support. Hopefully this will be enough to prevent nacelle sag for a good long time.

Two thoughts – isn’t it interesting that, once you find a useful material or a tool, you find all sorts of uses and applications for the material or tool?! This Millput stuff is wonderful for joints, seams, adding bulk where there isn’t any, and for making items like sleeping rolls, sand bags in scale model diaromas, or missing kits pieces! It seems as if the applications are endless and limited only by imagination!

Second, I am amazed by how a small step like making a pylon support takes days, almost weeks, of thinking and planning and yet result in so little progress forward in the build. Yet, while unseen and, perhaps, unnoticed, these steps are vital to laying the groundwork, the foundation, for success as yet unrealized!  Things that make you go “Huh.” :/

Thanks for viewing! Any opinions, comments or suggestions are welcome!

Steve
 
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

Offline Shawn McClure

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #35 on: January 30, 2016, 09:44:43 am »
That work certainly  shows patients on your part. It will certainly make a better model in the end. Great job Steve.

Shawn.
To build or not to build.... that is the question.   The answer.... build... Duh.

Offline trekker9211

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #36 on: January 30, 2016, 01:19:25 pm »
That looks like a sturdy fix Steve. Looking better every time!
Phil

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #37 on: February 08, 2016, 01:44:26 pm »
Sorry for taking so long between posts. I have been doing some large scale projects on my house during my free time lately.

Shawn and Phil, thanks for the props and encouragement! I am still amazed by how much planning goes into making a tiny change in the build – at least for me! I haven’t made a lot of progress with my build – unless you count research and planning as part of the build, then I have been busy.

Since Shaw has done an in-depth and detailed analysis of the 1966 AMT model on this blog http://federationreference.prophpbb.com/topic752110. html, I have pouring over his research.

One of the issues Shaw discovered is the Primary Hull Droop; as shown here.

Quote
“First, it seems that the sagging alignment issue isn't just with the nacelles and their supports, the top curve of the dorsal edges the nose of the primary hull downwards as well. I took a few shots of the model assembled, including some with the model pointed down, and it seems pretty clear that the nacelle alignment issue has nothing to do with gravity.” (Shaw, 2 Mar 2011)
D Shaw. (2011, Mar 2). Plans of the AMT 18 inch Enterprise. [Web log comment]. Retrieved from http://federationreference.prophpbb.com/topic752110.html

I’ve been working on figuring out how to counteract the inherent design flaw of the early AMT models. I glued the dorsal halves of the secondary hull together (pic 1) and then set up a jig to attempt to align the pieces in their correct planes. (pic 2) I discovered that, in order to have the plane of the primary hull parallel to the horizontal midline plane of the secondary hull, I’ll have to place a shim between the secondary hull interconnecting dorsal and the primary hull. (pic 3)

I’ve also been working on a color scheme for the build. I’ve seen other early long box builds and didn’t care for their high contrasting paint scheme. For example, the Energy/Matter Restoration Cowl on the aft of the Nacelles would be painted gunmetal grey and the Hanger Deck doors would be Steel blue. These would really conflict with the white primary color to overwhelm and dominate the look of the ship. So I am going with a more understated color scheme. Picture 4, with apologies to Shaw and Casimiro, is the plan for the scheme I’ll be using – once I get to that point of the build.

I know, my modeling Gurus, that I said this would be a restoration, especially with Cameron’s (Adm Tankton) opinion running paramount through my thoughts, in how I would approach the build. Another aspect swaying my thinking is this picture (pic 5) which is of the AMT model used in the TOS episode “Trouble with Tribbles”. While the Nacelle droop is pronounced, the primary hull is in parallel with the horizontal midline of the secondary hull. I can’t bear to see the old girl appearing tired and dropping as if in defeat.
So I think this is one area, that of restoring the intended profile of the ship rather than building to the limiting physical profile of the AMT Engineers, where it will be more of a modification over a restoration.

As always, I would love to read your comments and opinions on the build.

Thanks for reading,

Steve
« Last Edit: February 23, 2016, 07:32:30 am by MSgtUSAFRet »
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

Offline Shawn McClure

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #38 on: February 09, 2016, 07:45:15 am »
If I ever need a bubble level I know who to call.  Hahaha. 

You sure do your research on this stuff.  That is very cool.

Shawn
To build or not to build.... that is the question.   The answer.... build... Duh.

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #39 on: February 09, 2016, 09:55:28 am »
Yeah, I kinda went overboard on the levels.  ::) I just don't trust my eyes to get the lines right! :D

About the research - I really have to nod to Shaw for this; he did all the analysis. I'm just processing and applying it!

The application is dependent on how much of my "honey-do" list I get pared down! XD

Thanks for reading!

Steve

"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #40 on: February 22, 2016, 08:13:42 am »
Hey Everyone!

Apologies for the length between posts but I finally got some time away from the “honey-do” list and got to spend some time modeling! 8)

I’ve had time, though, to think through what I should do next in the build. I did a dry fit (Yes, I use a lot of bubble levels to align the pieces! :) ) and noticed something I knew I couldn’t live with – glaring builder mistakes!

1. Notice the arrows in the areas indicated. The first issue is the port nacelle (Red Arrow); the angle on the male support is “backwards”. It appears to have a slope up rather than down to meet the secondary hull. This would require a LOT of putty once it was attached and I didn’t want to have to mess with it that much while the model was assembled, so resigned to fix it. The interior face of the starboard nacelle is indicated by the white arrow. The grill or grid pattern on the support pylon was covered in acrylic from when I added the male support piece.  I have seen some builds (Crowe-t’s excellent build!) where the modeler removed the pattern completely and replaced the pattern with decals. I toyed with the idea for a while (0.68 seconds – an eternity for an android), but, as I am trying to restore over any other course of action, I, again, resigned to fix this as well.

2. I used several different techniques, borrowed from Dental Lab work, to gain the end results and thought someone might find it helpful if they ever faced a similar situation. For the port nacelle, I used a paint method of adding acrylic. By far the easiest, you would need a paint brush (disposable might be preferred), monomer (nail liquid from Sally’s Beauty Supply) and polymer (Nail powder – also from Sally’s). You dip the end of the brush in the monomer and then dip the tip of the brush into the polymer until a small, wet ball of polymer forms around the brush tip. Then placing the ball on the model area you want to bulk up, you work the acrylic with the wet brush until it is roughly the shape you want; adding a bit more than necessary to allow for finishing. Too much monomer and the acrylic flows into areas you don’t want it to go. Not enough and the acrylic will clump and not adhere to the plastic. Allow to set and, then, finish normally. It takes a few tries to get the right balance, but once you get the hang of it…. 8)

3. This is a picture of the section of the starboard nacelle I need to fix. I outlined it in pencil so I would know how big to make the impression.

4. Once again, I took the spare, Round2 starboard pylon and, using plaster setting stone, I made an impression/ matrix of the grid pattern. I applied a light coat of Vaseline as a release agent on the pylon prior to making the impression. The box is a plastic bin some carpenter nail came in – reinforced by painters tape. After I got a good mix of plaster (kinda looks like pancake batter), I painted a bit of it on the grid pattern on the pylon and then gently tapped the pylon to get the stone to flow into the details. Then I filled the plastic bin with the remainder of the stone and then gently squished the pylon into place.

5. This is the matrix after the stone set and after the “master” pylon was removed. I had an air bubble show up in the stone and filled it with some warmed candle’s wax. I dammed the end of the matrix with Play-do. The shine on the stone matrix is also a light coat of Vaseline as a release agent so the acrylic wouldn’t bond with the stone.

6. I then used the sprinkle technique to place the acrylic in the matrix. This is where you lightly sprinkle, like trying to get a small amount of salt on a steak, the polymer into the mold. Using an eyedropper, carefully allow the monomer to soak the polymer through capillary refill or wicking action. Repeat these steps as necessary until you get the bulk you need. Allow to set.

7. Once the acrylic is set (I test it with a scratch test), gently tease and pry the now duplicate piece out of the mold. This is a pic of the new piece by the old.

8. This is after the new piece has been inserted, puttied and sanded into place.

Sorry for the long post but I thought maybe some else may benefit. If you have any questions, I would be more than happy to answer; if I can. I’ve done some other puttying and finishing on the Interconnecting Dorsal and the Primary hull perimeter, but can’t show it in this post.

As always thanks for reading and any comments or suggestions are always welcome!

Steve
« Last Edit: February 22, 2016, 08:18:11 am by MSgtUSAFRet »
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

Offline Shawn McClure

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #41 on: February 22, 2016, 08:43:25 am »
Looks great Steve.  Man, you are putting some serious time in on this thing, but it is paying off.   .68 seconds... hahahaha,  that was great.

Shawn
To build or not to build.... that is the question.   The answer.... build... Duh.

Offline Shaw

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2016, 10:02:44 am »
After watching the tenacity you've directed at this project, I really need to build some time into my schedule to finally do my Enterprise. Very impressive work!

On the colors, are you going with white base color or something slightly off white (like insignia white)?

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #43 on: February 22, 2016, 12:47:23 pm »
LOL! Thanks, Shawn! I knew a serious trekker would get the reference! :D

Shaw, as for the color it will definitely be white - of some sort. 8) I was thinking of Pearl White as the final base hull color. I have been reading on Enterprise Refit boards where they are using 2 coats of Pure White (TS 26) followed by Pearl White (TS 45) to get the gleaming look  of the ST:TMP ship. I like the idea and want to give the GWW a depth of color. But, I am concerned about slight yellowing affect it may have. I will have to do a few test spoons to make sure. I should also test Insignia to see how it looks with a gloss coat. :o

PLEASE! I would love to see your (Shaw's) interpretation of the Classic 1/650!! I still have the bits and pieces from JTGraphics to build an accurate 1/650 production model  in my stash. (You'll note the use of the spare parts to help the GWW!) The Forum may bar me from only building the TOS model! XD


As always, thanks for reading and for the encouragements!

Steve
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: The Great White Whale Restoration
« Reply #44 on: February 23, 2016, 08:16:47 am »
Lest you think I am a glutton for punishment, I have been doing some regular modeling too!

1. I have puttied the nacelles. Here’s “dummy” (ala Ironman) holding the nacelles while the putty sets.

2. I used a fingernail file to smooth down and polish the Interconnecting Dorsal attachment site. The plastic there is stained by the old cement, but it seems to still be in good condition.

3.  This is going to be the mounting /display device for the model. Similar to the one I used for my 1/650 Enterprise build. I figured since it worked so well for that one, I would use it for this one too! Here is Dummy holding the rod and sprue ends while they dry.

4. Here I used a fingernail file with various grits to sand down the seam on the saucer section. I am going to use Shaw’s 1966 AMT model decals to replace the windows on the rim. I saw only one place where the saucer had a gap in the opening and, after placing the extra thin cement, taped it closed until the cement bonded/set.

5. I also spent some time finalizing the display support. I placed it as far forward as the sprue diameter would allow. The last time I used this technique, I placed it too far toward the stern and the ship tends be overbalanced. Again, I placed a hard stop at the top of the support, just shy of the top of the deflectors array so the dorsal secondary hull will close over top it.

I am resisting the urge to do extensive modifications – didn’t know it would be so difficult. But concerning the arrows on the ventral of the saucer, do you think I should scribe them in and then paint them, or leave them off as they weren’t part of the original mold?

Thanks for reading! Let me know you opinions!

Steve

« Last Edit: February 23, 2016, 08:21:21 am by MSgtUSAFRet »
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

 




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