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Author Topic: It's Not a TMP Refit 1/350, it's a STII:WOK Refit 1/350!  (Read 964 times)

Offline Quarky

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Re: It's Not a TMP Refit 1/350, it's a STII:WOK Refit 1/350!
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2017, 03:21:08 pm »
I'm surprised your LEDs are failing... What voltage are you running through them? If it's too high, that might be the answer to your issue.
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Offline FatalCheese

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Re: It's Not a TMP Refit 1/350, it's a STII:WOK Refit 1/350!
« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2017, 01:30:40 pm »
I'm surprised your LEDs are failing... What voltage are you running through them? If it's too high, that might be the answer to your issue.

I'm just testing them hooking up to a 9V battery - but the plan is to use an Arduino board to control the lights, using a 12V source.  So far I've lost 3 white 2mm bulbs, using the 470ohm resistors that HDAmodelworx included.  They work at first, and then I may grab one, hook up the alligator clips to the wires - magnet wire approx. 12" long - and then there's no joy. I remove the resistor and bulb and plug them in breadboard - the resistor still works, the bulb does not.  And I pitch both, none of the dead bulbs are using a reused resistor.

I'm not Johnny-Soldering Iron, and some times it takes me a few tries to get a clean solder connection when attaching the resistor to the bulb.  Are they sensitive to heat?  Although, we're talking 5-15 secs max of heat applied during each attempt where the iron is touching the bulb pin.  Could that shortening the life?

Thanks,
Brian 
You're in it this far...what's another $20?

Offline simi

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Re: It's Not a TMP Refit 1/350, it's a STII:WOK Refit 1/350!
« Reply #17 on: October 06, 2017, 04:32:57 pm »
Not too great that myself - but confirm you have the correct ohm resistor first.  For 12v, 470 ohm sounds about right (for white LEDs).  Perhaps try the next step up?

As for the soldering iron, there really isn't anything to "fry" for resistors AFAIK.  But I HAVE wrecked LEDs with my soldering iron when I've attempted to solder right next to where the leads meet the LED plastic (because I needed the space).  15 seconds seems like a really long time to have the iron in contact with the pin.  Did you tin the pin (which should make the connection easier/faster)?  When I see this done online, the iron is usually on the lead for more like 1-3 seconds.  But I'm not great at soldering either, so I could be wrong about that.

Cheers!

Simi
As a software architect, I'm pretty darn good.  As someone with knowledge of building things in the real world, well, I'm a software architect.

Offline whb64

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Re: It's Not a TMP Refit 1/350, it's a STII:WOK Refit 1/350!
« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2017, 07:38:53 pm »
Also if you have some helping hands, clip the alligator clip on the LED so it's between the place you intend to solder and the LED.  This will act as a heat sink and help keep excess heat from the LED.  It won't remove all of it but it will remove most.

Offline FatalCheese

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Re: It's Not a TMP Refit 1/350, it's a STII:WOK Refit 1/350!
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2017, 10:07:59 pm »
Appreciate everyone's suggestions on the LEDs. I've been a little more cautious about my soldering and how long I'm applying heat. Using helping hands was a great suggestion, thanks @whb64.  No bulbs lost since.

Well, it's been a while - have to travel for work quite a bit, and lately it's been constant commutes to NYC (I live in Seattle), so progress has been pretty slow. I've been debating whether to throw some canopy glue and sandpaper in my overnight bag, and a few pieces in my luggage to work on during down time. I don't know whether that confirms having dedication or having issues. 




For dealing removing the raised phaser inaccuracy, I thought taping around it and sanding it flush (using the tape to let me know when I'm almost flush) would work. It worked about as well as that fool-proof idea to win at Roulette, I once had.

Aside from not being flush, I ended up somehow sanding grooves in the surface. Suffice to say, it looked horrible. 



I ended up sanding the phasers completely off, and filling the gaps. I ended up doing what I was orignally hoping to avoid, which is rescribing lines.

I'm not thrilled about the results, but after applying paint, aztecs, and decals, (and whatever I use for new turrets) I'm hoping this won't stand out like it does now.



This was a frustrating part to install. Easy to bend, and it just was never right afterwards. 
Also, it seems the holes in the model part are too large for the paragrafix part, there is a slight gap. Kicking around re-doing this, but it was a time-suck, and just need to set aside for now.

I attached the washers to form my new saucer nav light fixtures that I had earlier mutilated, and using canopy glue to form the "bulb". This actually looked great for scale. I need to re-do the glue "bulb" as I'm having to re-prime and paint, but should look quite nice.

My bulb failures had me contemplating a dual-bulb system - two bulbs being equidistant between the upper and lower saucer light fixtures, so I could activate a "back-up" bulb in the event one failed. However, with the bulb placed evenly between the top and bottom saucers - there was barely any light getting to the canopy glue "bulb".  It was only when placing the LED right up underneath the fixture, where the light looked an acceptable level. 

I debated to experiment with brighter LEDs, but came to the conclusion there wasn't really the space for two LEDs to be positioned in a way where either LED would result in the same light level in the "bulb". So for now, I'm proceeding with one-bulb per fixture, and will hope that a final stress test of bulbs will be sufficient before sealing.

While I'm using an adhesion promoter, I'm not entirely sure paint is going to stick to the metal washers I used long-term.  Debating metal primer, but ugh! This is less than one square inch of surface I need to prime!

Progress on the saucer - installed my RCS bulbs and some of my LED tape.  I saw someone recommended aluminum tape for light blocking, and decided to give it a try.
I don't know that I'm totally convinced it's really any easier than just painting, considering you can't get everywhere with tape, and still have to paint regardless.

But I guess it's looks cooler!

Cheers,
Brian

« Last Edit: November 16, 2017, 10:09:46 pm by FatalCheese »
You're in it this far...what's another $20?

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: It's Not a TMP Refit 1/350, it's a STII:WOK Refit 1/350!
« Reply #20 on: November 21, 2017, 08:24:25 am »
Brian, this is looking awesomely outstanding! (It could just be outstandingly awesome; still can't decide!)

I love what you did with the canopy "bulbs"! Nice trick!

I have used the metallic tape but only on hot spots. Like you said, not sure you can "get everywhere" with the tape. But, at least you are willing to try new techniques!

Keep going! This is shaping up to be an awesome build!

Steve
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

 




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