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Author Topic: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build  (Read 396 times)

Offline Cpt-Spekkie

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Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« on: September 19, 2017, 06:14:11 pm »
Well guys its time for me to start the build topic of my first ever attempted kit build. As some people have read in my introduction topic and in the completed build part of the forum, I started my model building journey with 3D printing and lighting a Runabout. I have to say that was fun, but a Runabout is in my eyes a "camper van" not a real starship and thus its time to move on to bigger fish.  ;D

Do i love the Enterprise? Off course i do, i love the D, i love the E and the refit has a special place in my heart, but there's no place in hell i will attempt to build a 350 refit. So lets get the next best thing, Voyager! Janeway brought her home in 7 years, lets see if i can complete my journey a little faster.

Okay before diving right into the action, lets back up a little bit and say i have watched about every video on Youtube about people building the Revell kit and naturally i've watched a lot of Boyd's video's (gotta have some refit action now and then). So being the red shirt i am, i know a little bit what is coming my way with this build. I will however not be using or doing all the steps some people would say are required for a model to be perfect. I know the kit has issues, and some i will address, but i do not have the skillset yet to fix them all.

Having that said, i do have a 3D printer and some experience in Fusion 360, so designing and printing some custom peaces to help me along will not be that hard. The Photoetch set for instance, i love what it can do for a model to make it perfect, but grinding down detail on the model and then replacing it with the brass parts is still very daunting for me. So no, i will forgo the Photoetch set. I will however use the technique to make the bigger windows in a same way. Painting the originals is just not gonna happen.

Furthermore i do not have the skill or equipment to airbrush. I love the work of others that have demonstrated what can be done with an airbrush, however i do currently not have the finances to justify to buy a set. Foremost because i do not know if a build after Voyager is in my future. So for now i will try and paint the kit with spray cans and brush the details on.

Lighting is an other story, we all need some light in our lives, so if it can be lit, i want to light it.

Okay enough jibber jabber, we all know the first step in building these beauties. "Drill out all the windows!"

Smallest drillbit i could find in my arsenal is 1mm, so that should just work. Time to get the dremel and BAM, first snag. The drillbit is to small to fit the dremel. DOH.
Okay a pinvise you say, nope don't have it and not planning on doing this all by hand. So maybe a cordless drill? Yeah why not, the bit fits and i can even very carefully control the speed with the trigger, and it can drill so slow that even the plastic will not meld as it would have done with the dremel. So all in all this might work.
I may be a redshirt, i'm not a fool, start on the lower saucer windows. If i fail chances are you are not going to see it immediately.


Okay not bad at all, maybe i can really do this. Sparking this confidence i decided to tape up the model and throwing in a random peace of led strip and light it up.


Still a long way to go, but seeing this inspires me even more. So lets move on.

Next up planning the electronics and ordering it all so that the build can progress. Yes the noob in me is already starting to ADHD this project all over the place.
Attacking it on multiple fronts. But back to the electronics. I've watched some key episodes, the 4K remake of the intro, and as i already said almost every build video. So i know what i need. Anti collision lights, red and green nav lights that do not blink, the standard blue and red for the nacelles, deflector and impuls engines, a shitload of warm/ natural white for the interior, a floodlight of some sorts, and red for the torpedo tubes.

Time to decide, do i build a 555 timer setup, buy a Tena controls board, or use the same Velleman model railway blinker board i used in the Runabout for the anti collision lights? Well to decide what do i want. I want the model to be detachable from the base without first needing to desolder wires. So not more then power and ground through a pole with a DC jack just like on the Runabout build. Fine, but what about maybe a board with the warp effects and photon torpedo effects with a remote or something. Yeah well no money for an airbrush, means also back to basics on the lighting. Fine as cheap as possible it is.  ::)

So i went with the Velleman kit, its only about 5 euro's and i can adjust the speed to my liking. So yeah makes sense. But i can make it a little interesting i think. The anti collision strobes are a quick on flash, that leaves the other side of the board with a quick off flash. Normally this is taped off or painted black as to not interfere with the other lights, but what about using that side to maybe strobe the light on top of the shuttlebay some people have installed. Makes it a little more interesting than only having the normal strobes. Yeah lets do that.


I would say welcome to how my mind works i guess, i have made a little more progress than outlined in this opening post of my build. But i think its enough text for now. And i need to sort through some of the pictures to make it a little bit more linear as Captain Sisco would say.  :P

Oh and if anyone have comments on my build, or tips for me, questions or anything. Don't hesitate to post. I can use all the help i can get. Would be a shame if i decided something and regret it later due to a far better suggestion here in the forums.

So thanks guys if you have made it to here with the read and i will update with my progress soon.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 04:35:43 pm by Cpt-Spekkie »
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Currently building the U.S.S. Voyager model kit by Revell

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2017, 03:27:58 pm »
Cpt-Spekkie, Excellent write up and writing style! It always makes for a good read!

While I understand the trepidation of facing a massive 350 build (especially the Refit!) the Voyager is by no means a small fry or starter kit! It will have challenges and triumphs galore!

You sound up to the task and I will be watching as you tackle this beauty!

Good luck!

Steve
"As long as there is injustice, whenever a Targathian baby cries out, wherever a distress signal sounds among the stars, we'll be there. This fine ship, this fine crew. Never give up... and never surrender."

Offline Cpt-Spekkie

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2017, 05:14:32 pm »
Thank you for your kind words Steve!

And after reading my opening again after your reply i must admit it sound like i implied that the Voyager would be a simple build. Well let me correct that here and now. I think there is not a single starship or similar kit that is a breeze and to be honest i would even want it to be! I want to learn, i want to make mistakes... Wait what?  :o

Uhm, no, no i don't want to make mistakes. What was i thinking... Oh well, off course i don't want to make mistakes, but from mistakes we learn so i know definitely that i will make a few. Especially as i already did. However i have not made a critical failure yet. I could say i've been very lucky so far, small lapses in judgement like forgetting to clean the plastic and using primer before painting the inner coat for light blocking. Rookie mistake i know, but it did show me not to do this for the outside of the model. So lessen learned for when i get to the real painting.

And you are absolutely 100% right when you say that this kit has its challenges and things to overcome. I'm finding them out the way i assume everybody here found out, step by step.  ;)


Oh maybe i can sneak in a question for anyone who can answer this. I'm already thinking of the wiring and electronics in this model, and the problems that can arise with the wires creating shadows in the model. Naturally i need to glu down as many cables as i can as to ensure they do not cast shadows. But at one time or another i will need to combine the primary saucer and the secondary (engineering) hull. The problem in my mind with this is that would have to connect the cables for the various lighting together. But soldering up these cables means i need them a certain length so i can solder, with the 2 main peaces still side by side or close to each other. And then the tricky part that keeps playing in my mind, how do i secure those cables when installing the saucer into the engineering hull? I can't seem to think of a way, as to have short wires or some way of securing them as to not cast shadows  ???

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Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2017, 08:02:51 am »
Cpt-Spekkie,

Oh, No, Dude! I only meant to imply that I admired your courage to take on what, IMHO, is just as complex as is the 350; any of 'em!

I think a "simple" build is an OOB TOS Romulan BoP (Despite how complex I made mine here!). Ya know, grand total of, like, 9 pieces?!?  ;D I still will follow along to see your awesome build come to life and live vicariously through your talent!

As far as the "shadows" caused by wires in front of your lights - I'm not exactly sure what you are talking about. Pictures may help, if you have any.

Tacking down the wires - I use gorilla glue (preferred) or hot glue to tack them in place. I use the gorilla glue prior to using light blocking on the interior of the model, then I light block over the gorilla glue. It worked well on my first lighted build and seems to be working on my NSEA Protector build. Hot glue can be used, but could also pop off after it has cooled as it may not have gotten a firm adhesion bond to the light-blocking paint.

As for connecting the saucer and the secondary hull together - I have seen a techinque where a male/female connector is used on the wires between the halves. Then the shortness (is that a word?) between the wires won't matter as, when you are ready, you can connect the, uhm, connectors and cement the halves together; knowing your wiring is secured.

Hope this helps a bit. Maybe some of the true Masters of the Site can comment!

Just a tip. There is a question and answer section of this site called Modelers Questions Board. Your questions would get more exposure there and more Masters would chime in.

Food for thought!

Keep going!

Steve
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 08:05:02 am by MSgtUSAFRet »
"As long as there is injustice, whenever a Targathian baby cries out, wherever a distress signal sounds among the stars, we'll be there. This fine ship, this fine crew. Never give up... and never surrender."

Offline Cpt-Spekkie

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2017, 05:13:28 pm »
Hey Steve,

Thanks again for these words of wisdom! I'm beginning to see that despite the size difference the 350 models and the Voyager are mostly the same. Then again i still do consider this build a little easier, not simpler but easier, why you may ask? Simpel, the size makes it just a little more manageable i think.

As for the shadows i was fearing, i don't have currently pictures to illustrate my thoughts, but to elaborate with words on this: i would suspect that if a wire would be to hang free in mid air it could block some of the light for some of the windows. So when viewing from a certain angle, you would get a little darker window. At least that was what i suspected.
My plan for this is to tack the wires to the surface at intervals so that it will not hang in mid air. So again thank you for the suggestions on this.

The usage of connectors was something i was considering but was afraid to use for the possibility that they would come apart when handling the model for the detail painting and application of the decals. It never came to me, to glue / cement the connectors once connected. So current plan for that is to directly solder as much as possible and then use use Dupond stile connectors on a pin header on my break out board i was planning in the engineering hull.

LAstly i will keep that board in mind for future questions  ;)

And now its time for me to write up an extensive update on the build.
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Offline Cpt-Spekkie

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2017, 06:25:42 pm »
Chief engineers log, Supplemental,

In my last log entry i left things at the completion of drilling the windows and subsequently test lighting the hull, well i can report now that work on the Voyager is progressing at a steady pace.
Unfortunately this is also the time and place where the first lack of training has showed its head. Luckily it was contained to the light blocking part of the hull and could be salvaged.
As this is a full disclosure topic so that also others can learn from my experiences, i can say that i forgot to clean the plastic and also did not use a primer before spraying a mat black paint on the inside of the hull.

At first the paint seemed to hold and thus i followed up the black with a white layer as this would help the light to reflect in the model. Thinking that i was done, i decided to glue the 2 halves of the engineering hull together. I did remember to clean off the paint from the seam (otherwise the cement/ glue would not fuse the plastic together) and so i applied a careful line of the contacta professional. I connected the halves and used masking tape to hold it in shape.

Not knowing how long the glue would need, i left it for a couple of hours and began some work on the bottom section of the saucer. I wanted to install some of the LED strip lighting in a similar pattern to Karve.

About an hour had passed so i shifted my focus back to the engineering section to see if the glue had done its work. Fully expecting that a proper bond would take mush longer i wanted to check my seam, so i pulled of the masking tape on the inside and then the aforementioned happened, the paint came of with the tape. Quick test with a led flashlight confirmed my suspicions, no more light blocking at that location.

At this point i should have used something to strip the paint of the model and start again. But not having this and the fact i had already installed the LED strip lighting on the lower saucer pushed me forward. So paint over the engineering hull again and be very careful in handling the inner paint. Again i learned here for the outside of the model.  ;)

Decided to put in the front of the engineering hull as this would give that section much of its stiffness and support and applied some plastic putty on the seam as to help in some strength / light blocking.


Here you can still see the "hole" i made in the paint from removing the masking tape. Also drilled out the front torpedo tubes which luckily went well. I know there is overspray here on the outside of the hull, this will be cleaned up before painting the outside. The cables of the led strips are here held in place by masking tape, but this earth color (yellow/green) is not ideal, so will be covered up with white tape or removed all together. Although removal can result in paint failure, so have to be careful in what i decide.


Moving on i focussed my attention to the nacelles. Here my first ever contact with a clear glue for the chiller grills and bussard windows would come into play. I was planning on using canapy glue as this is what i saw in most builds, but unfortunately the online store i bought it from (together with a liquid mask and decal soft was still not delivered and presumed lost in mail  ::)
So before a replacement can be send out by that shop i looked at an alternative, as i wanted to continue work on the nacelles. I did have a bottle of the Micro Kristal Klear (intended to fill the windows i had drilled out) As far as i know this is also a clear glue that can do the same as canopy glue, so i gave it a shot. This seems to work fine, so don't know if there is a real difference between the Kristal Klear and the canopy glue.

I know that the chiller grill is supposed to be a copper color on the outside when the engines are offline, but not having a airbrush system i am not trusting myself with painting the grills a copper color. So i have the following idea in mind. I think i want the grill and bussard windows to remain unpainted. The idea is this way its like there is nothing in the nacelle when the model is powered down. And then when the monkey flips the switch the system comes online and the nacelle is filled with a nice blue light in the grills and a even red in the bussard section.

To help with this separation between the 2 main colors i made use of the 3D printer. Measured and designed a small peace for in between the two sections and also hold the red 5mm led for the bussards. You will however need to paint the back of the led black for light blocking. The blue light will be made with a 6 LED strip that is mounted in the top shell and the light we see through the grills is only reflected light. Should give us a nice blue fill without hotspots. For the nav lights i'm using 1.8mm led's, these are in my opinion just small enough to be usable for this application. 1mm would be better, but this is what i have to work with.



The lighting of the nacelles is by far not complete, as it stands now i have 4 pair of wires coming out of the nacelle and that is unacceptable for a moving pylon i think. So will need to think of a way to integrate all the lighting into hopefully one wire pair. But also make it seem as if there is nothing in the nacelle when the lights are off. So fun times a head.  ;D


As always, if any of you have comments, tips, questions and so on, don't hesitate to respond.

For now Patrick out.
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Currently building the U.S.S. Voyager model kit by Revell

Offline LynnInDenver

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2017, 08:31:49 am »
A couple of recommendations:

Don't use tape to hold the wires down inside the hull, it will age and eventually come loose. Instead, use superglue.

Second, for the grills, do a test with dry brushing color on the grills. Use an acrylic so you can wipe it off quickly if the test doesn't work. In this case, you're looking for enough that it shows a copper sheen when off, yet doesn't block the light when on.

Offline Macupar

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2017, 08:44:28 am »
Your build is looking great! The 3d printed part for the war engine is awesome. I think lots of Voyager builders would be interested in purchasing them.

Mike

Offline Cpt-Spekkie

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #8 on: September 22, 2017, 10:19:00 am »
Thanks LynnInDenver, never considered what the glue of the tape would do over time.  ::)
The tape i used is waterproof outdoor double sided tape, and removing that now will result in a lot more work from damage to the lightblock, but i will install a superglue backup next to the tape. So that down the line the cable stay secure even when the tape would fail.  ;)

As for the painting of the grills, i don't have paint in the correct color at hand. I tried painting with the grey color on one of the windows that i know i would not be using and both with the spraycan and a little pot and brush i could not get it to look nice. The spraycan kind of worked, but i didn't want o bay a whole can just for two smalls grills in copper.
So if i may ask what are you referring to when you say dry brushing? maybe that my painting technique is flawed.

Macupar, Thank you for the compliment!
I am planning on grouping all the 3D printed peaces i design and use in my build and post them on Thingiverse.com. Its a website for sharing 3D models that people with 3D printers can use to print. I'm not planning on selling the designs or parts. I will be sharing the designs freely to give a little back to the community.
Currently working on a separation wall for behind the deflector dish. Also planning on the larger windows to replace the stock ones.
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Offline RaveN

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2017, 11:08:22 am »
Looking great so far! This is a great kit to build.

Offline LynnInDenver

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2017, 10:02:07 pm »
So if i may ask what are you referring to when you say dry brushing? maybe that my painting technique is flawed.

You get some paint in the brush, brush it on a piece of paper or towel until it's almost dry, then gently brush it along the surface. The technique adds color to the high spots, without leaving enough of the carrier that it goes down into the low spots. It's usually used to lighten raised spots like rivets.

Offline Cpt-Spekkie

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #11 on: September 23, 2017, 02:47:18 am »
Okay now I see what you mean! That technique I could try.  ;D
Thanks Lynn  8)
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Offline Cpt-Spekkie

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2017, 05:57:48 pm »
Its that time again, time for a status update on my Voyager build.

Last time i ended with the construction of the nacelles and although i wanted to simplify the wires coming out of them, i opted to first create the deflector lighting in the engineering hull.
For this i needed a sort of wall to divide the deflector section from the main room, as not to spill any of the blue light. So a quick draw up on Fusion resulted in a 3mm thick curved plate that should fit perfectly in the hull. Some super glue and a 3 led piece of led tape later and  would have a lit up deflector dish.



The middle dish part is obviously not glued into place here, and also the clear part is just resting in place for a light test.

So far i'm happy with the amount of light the 3 led's give off and with the middle dish in place you cant see the individual led's so pretty much perfect.  8)

Next up was designing and printing the window borders. As i stated earlier i didn't opt to go for the photoetch, i found it would have been a shame to use so little of a nice photoetch set, and furthermore having the ability to print my own parts would mean i could try and make the window inserts as close to perfect as possible. So not having to use some styrene to make the rounded over thicker parts between the windows. On the photo the bars are not that noticeable between the 3 window cutouts. But they are there and after paint it should be more visible.


Being content with the look, fit and finish of the first windows in the engineering hull, i continued and made the windows for the saucer. I did however not photograph these before painting the base coat.  ::)

So set a course for the paint booth (cardboard box on its side in our backyard that is roofed over). Because i didn't have any experience with fully painting models i wanted to try and spray the engineering hull before installing the rest in it. So masked off the led strip for the deflector and started with two light coatings of the Revell white base coat. Followed that up with again two light coats of the light grey paint. As this was the color i thought i had seen in the instructions. Turned out it should have been a blend of 70% light grey and 30% of medium grey  :o mixing colors with spray cans is something that is impossible as far as i know, so i went ahead with the light grey as my base color. (Still have to decide now if i want the medium grey as my secondary color on the fantail or a blend of say 70% light and 30% medium, think i have to experiment on a test piece for this)

Well i wasn't unhappy with the first outer paint i put on the model, but it was also not perfect. It had a little bit of a texture in stead of being smooth, as seen here:


I suspect the reason for the texture to be a result of over spray and not applying a slightly thicker coat on the last pass. So the next day i attempted to paint the saucer, first the lower halve and when i saw that that one turned out much better, i decided to do the top saucer. A few photos in a second, but i have to say i first thought one can of the grey would be enough for the model, but boy was i wrong! There is only 100ml in the can (150ml for the primer) so that is not much. I could get bigger cans for the same price at the home improvement stores, but i guess this paint is specially optimized for painting models, so yeah i don't want to cheap out here. But yeah i can see the appeal of a spray system for the builders that build more then one model. So who knows in the future.



Oh as you can see on the closeup of the back section of the upper saucer, i got a little mishap where the paint drooped down a little. The coat was just a bit to thick there. This has since been corrected, after carefully sanding that place smooth and then respraying that section. Making sure that the last coat would be again the whole upper saucer, as not to create the texture i had on the first hull part.  ;)

After this i did two last things that i want to address in this status update. Namely the first attempt at making the windows in the engineering hull with the Micro Kristal Klear. I only took one picture of this when the glue was first applied. And on some it was a bit thick, but luckily once dry it is perfectly clear and the light shines through without any issue. So very happy about this approach.


And last but not least, i managed to simplify the wiring for the nacelle. The 4 wire pairs coming out (blue warp, red bussard, and 2 sets for the nav lights) have been reduced to one shared pair!


I don't have a clear picture of the inside, but it comes down to this:
The led tape with the blue led's have 3 contact points, (6 leds in groups of 3) the middle pads are where the single wire pair is connected and comes out of the nacelle. The 3 other led's (bussard and nav) all combine and are attached at the connection pads of the blue strip at the back. (here i could hide the wired the best) This way the nacelle still looks empty from the outside. But having said that, i have tonight ordered my third can of light grey paint and also a small put of copper aqua to try and color the chiller grills as intended by the great Rick Sternbach.  ;D So will have to give the suggestion of Lynn a try and see if i can pull this off.

So as always, if anyone has suggestions or comments, post them as i enjoy reading them!
« Last Edit: September 26, 2017, 05:59:36 pm by Cpt-Spekkie »
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Currently building the U.S.S. Voyager model kit by Revell

Offline scottminium

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2017, 07:28:19 pm »
I second what Lynn said about the tape.  You can also consider Gorilla glue, which will bond dang near anything.  Just a dab and things will stay bonded.  Also, if you pull up the tape and the lightblocking is damaged, you can brush paint something think like Tulip fabric paint.

Finally, you can glue bits of strip styrene to the kit, form a channel and glue a piece over it to secure the wires.  Just another solution.
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Offline Cpt-Spekkie

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Re: Revell USS Voyager my first kit build
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2017, 06:30:11 pm »
A few days have passed and i have to say made quite some progress on the Voyager build. So lets get up to speed shall we...

After i simplified the electronics in the nacelles in the last update i wanted to do a light test on the main deflector with the 2 front facing torpedo tubes. This mainly to determine the resistor value for the 2 led's. Normally you can calculate what you need and that would be the case in this instance. But i'm a big fan of keeping the lighting in scale with the whole shebang, so there are places where a 560 Ohm resister would be enough to safely drive the led, however a 1K resister dims down the led to a nicer level. Also is means the led's are under driven and thus are never pushed. (better for long life)


The picture taken is a little blown out, but in person i think it is spot on. So time to continue on with the installation of the nav lights in the saucer, the creation of the electronics (break out boards and wiring of the main engineering hull.



On the first picture we can see the Velleman led blinker board on which i connected the led wired onto a breadboard so that i can create rails for connecting the anti collision lights. At this point i was still debating if i wanted the led above the shuttle bay to blink in the apposite way of the other anti collision lights. Thats why i had broken out both of the led positions of the blinker board. After seeing the result, (the light would be off to short of a time to really go dark) i decided to not follow through with this and just make the that led the same as the rest. So to finish the circuit i used the original led, but with some extra resisters to make it as dim as i could. And them to tape over it, so that no light would leak.

Only thing that bothered me at the time was that you could see the grean/yellow tape though the bigger windows, but that would not be a problem for long  ;)
Coming back to the break out board, you can see a couple of pin headers, these are for Dupont style connectors, that i am going to use to still be able to take apart the model while working on the sections.
Once all work is complete and assembly begins, i will glue the connectors in place as suggested by Steve earlier in the thread.

And some wires are somewhat long, but the fear of creating shadows was completely unfounded with my led strip setup and use of the Micro Kristal Klear windows.

Next i glued up the nacelles and sanded them flush and used the plastic putty where necessary so make them one piece and light leak free.


Very pleased with the result and i have to really say i almost didn't need to use the putty at all. Once clamped down it fitted perfectly well. I'm really fortunate with the fit of this model so far!

So whit this all done, it was time to test the lighting in the saucer and see if the led i had installed to serve as a flood light did the trick and also to see if the nav / anti collision lights worked.


And yes i think the flood light comes across very nicely. I really like the colder light temperature in contrast to the warm inner lighting. Also here we can see the reason why the green/yellow isolation tape will not be seen. I used the images i got from Karve so create the rooms behind the bigger windows where possible. So Thanks again Karve for the file and info on how to do this. The picture is a little blurry, and i still need to install some paper behind the windows in the saucer, because those a a little blown out without it. (losing its contrast of the colors from the rooms)

But again really loving the lighting so far. In fact it gave me energy to continue on and get the fantail section to a point where i could test the whole ship. So onwards i went.  ;D

First lets glue up the pylons now that i have the led's for the impuls engines soldered up and after that glue them to the nacelles. Lastly start the putty and sanding routine for them. (Here i needed.a little more putty then on the earlier peaces. But still not much.)


When you don't have real glue clamps i have to recommend the use of washing line clamps. (don't really know the term of these in english  ::) )

But without further a due, here is a full(ish) light test and dry fitting of the model so far:



So what do you guys think of the model so far?
Myself i really like that the nacelles and pylons can still move to the upward position and think that the light of the chiller grills is nice and uniform.

The back windows in the fan tail as you can see are not installed anymore, i had them in but i can't get it to light properly with the amount of blockage from the 6 nav/collision led's. There is just not enough space in the way i did this.  ::) But no problem, i can putty this back closed when i have glues up the middle section and then use the decals to place the windows. (can't win them all i guess)

So yeah a long update, but as always, i'm looking forward to any comments and or tips.
And i will say, even negative comments are valuable for me, because if i have made some mistakes, i would like to hear about them so i can learn from them.  :)
3D printing enthusiast - Model making noob - SciFi fanatic
Currently building the U.S.S. Voyager model kit by Revell

 




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