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Author Topic: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise  (Read 179 times)

Offline ebt12

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Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« on: November 21, 2017, 10:38:07 pm »
I have had this model of the 1/537 for well over 20 years and finally picked it up to work on it again. With the many problems and inaccuracies of the model I think it is a good model to practice on, specifically using putty to fill in the hull pattern, and to practice with primer and paint. This practice is for when I get the 1/350 Enterprise.

Patrick
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And don't blink
Good luck!
- The Doctor

Offline Decoman

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Re: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2017, 01:12:35 am »
One youtuber apparently claimed that using Tamiya's extra thin cement don't work with the plastic (presumably the 1:350 polar lights kit), but maybe he only meant that it would be too weak. I am curious to learn if the plastic is like any other scale model kit (I am guessing that it is).

For putty, I usually like using Vallejo's white putty (non toxic, or very much less toxic). Best used with a coarse sanding stick, or a fine metal file like Tamiya's diamond file (for photo etch parts). Like most putty probably, one can't just fill an area with this stuff and expect to fill a large cavity at once. A danger with using Tamiya's putty (toxic obnoxious stuff), is that the putty reacts with the plastic, and too much will have the plastic/styrene warping.

My 1:350 Enterprise Refit kit has not yet arrived, so I can't say much about the kit parts. Having gotten about a year's worth of airbrushing training, I think I've learned that the end result for a paint finish, greatly rely on the smoothness of the initial state of the painted surface. Although I suspect that the plastic is more smooth, would it turn out to be coarse, I would be tempted to go over the plastic with some fine sanding paper, but it would be crucial to remove ALL the dust, so that the dust don't clog the panel lines. A secondary concern with regard to working with a more smooth surface, would be to try correct any unevenness that ends up being there with each layer of paint.

I already knew that metallic paint would look worse additional coats over it (I am using Vallejo's acrylic paint), but maybe it doesn't have to look that much worse, if one is more careful with adding gloss coats and any varnishes. I think I've learned that if your metallic surface looses its shine, after adding a varnish, then adding a slight gloss coat over that again, can restore some of the shininess.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 01:22:38 am by Decoman »

Offline Decoman

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Re: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2017, 02:11:51 pm »
I would test out approaches to avoiding orange peel for the painting, or for avoiding general unevenness.

What you should try out, is to start using fine sand paper, after every layer of paint, to sand down all uneven areas, with each layer of painting.

You must be careful not to sand through the paint.
You must be attentive to cleaning ALL panel lines, ELSE, the dust from the sanding risk clogging the panel lines, and then in the end, things won't look pretty if the panel lines are filled with dust trapped under a gloss coat.

I worked on this 1:350 submarine model, and added some 7-8 layers of gloss coat, as an experiment to achieve a very smooth glossy coat. Unfortunately, I forgot to clean the dust from the panel lines in places, and I was impatient, and did not let each gloss coat dry for 12 hours, and so there was tension building up at the bottom layer or something, making the layers of gloss coat start cracking in places around the model.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 02:14:57 pm by Decoman »

Offline MattA

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Re: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2017, 09:53:21 pm »
I've built a 537 and a 350 scale refit.  I just finished the 537 last month, and found that while challenging, it turned out to be fun.  I didn't fill the brick pattern, and it wound up being ok.  Filling it in will look better, of course.  I also lit mine.  It definitely gives the impression of being the Enterprise.

Good luck with the build! 
Builder of all things StarShip...

Offline Decoman

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Re: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2017, 02:27:21 am »
I am working with a custom stand idea for my to-be-built Refit model, you might want to check it out some time when I get to build the stand. It does seem like I will have to close the hangar door, which is ok, as that part of the model isn't important to me, as I probably will need to have a metal rod protruding through the rear part of the interior of the model. :)

General description of my stand idea: Imagine the Enterprise resting on the top of a sharp shaped wave, which is shaped to curve forwards, and slopes backwards (where the buttons for lighting will be). Imagine holding your hands together, and then try bending all the fingers on both hands to either side to create a pointy  "wave" shape.

I will use 3D editor software to render a mock model, to get an idea how the curved shapes will reflect either the ship model to be on top, and any starfleet logo added to the stand. :)
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 02:34:06 am by Decoman »

Offline greg

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Re: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2017, 08:32:08 pm »
I do not know how modelers can use Tamiya Extra Thin cement as their main cement successfully since it dries out so quickly. I only use the extra thin for its capillary action to seep into the seams. In terms of this large model, I imagine it would be best to use Tamiya's regular cement.

Offline Decoman

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Re: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2017, 03:48:43 am »
The Tamiya Extra Thin Cement is supposed to be used on the outside of the seams (holding two parts together before adding glue), but hm, it sounds like you already know this. :)

Having said that, I have no experience working with larger model and using this Tamiya Extra Thin Cement. I will try though, but I will be very self conscious about possible weak points around the refit model I ordered.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2017, 03:50:23 am by Decoman »

Offline greg

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Re: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2017, 11:43:42 pm »
The Tamiya Extra Thin Cement is supposed to be used on the outside of the seams (holding two parts together before adding glue), but hm, it sounds like you already know this. :)
Yeah, and holding large parts together and hoping that this super thin glue is going to hold them together is not what I would think to do. Sometimes I will use the stringy Testors cement since it melts the plastic so well. I hate the strings, but appreciate how it fuses styrene together.

Offline MSgtUSAFRet

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Re: Practicing on the 1/537 Enterprise
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2017, 07:28:22 am »
Hey Gents,

The Tamiya Extra Thin Cement is supposed to be used on the outside of the seams (holding two parts together before adding glue), but hm, it sounds like you already know this. :)
Yeah, and holding large parts together and hoping that this super thin glue is going to hold them together is not what I would think to do. Sometimes I will use the stringy Testors cement since it melts the plastic so well. I hate the strings, but appreciate how it fuses styrene together.

From my experience, the Tamiya Extra Thin Cement, while great for its capillary action, is also a welding type glue. It melts the styrene slightly and fuses the two pieces together. The TETC is not like CA which relies, primarily, on the CA material to create and maintain the bond, but that it welds/fuses the material together.

I have used the TETC on some "medium" scale builds (650 and 1400) and have yet to notice a difference in the bonding strength of the cement. Admittedly, I haven't done a 350 so I can't speak from experience for this scale and the TETC.

Boyd almost swears by the Testors red tube cement so it seems like it comes down to a matter of preference and what type of bond you need rather than the tensile strength of the glue.

Just thinking!

Keep going, ebt12! I would love to see how you are doing on your build!

LLAP!

Steve
"To be honest with you, Picard, a significant number of my crew members have expressed a desire to return even knowing the odds. Some because they can't bear to live without their loved ones, some because they don't like the idea of slipping out in the middle of a fight."

 




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