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Author Topic: Took the Leap!  (Read 229 times)

Offline Merrittk54

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Took the Leap!
« on: August 24, 2018, 11:45:44 am »
I've jumped right in and purchased the 1/350 USS Enterprise Refit Kit.  Very excited.  I bought it mainly for a winter project but I may get started sooner than that.  After watching a number of videos, most notably the ones by Boyd, I felt that there is enough information and help available to be successful with the kit.

I do have a couple easy-peasy questions:

1.  The aztekking decals that are available for purchase;  if those are used and a very good job is done with them, do they stack up nicely against the airbrushed aztekking?  I'm pretty good with decals but have never airbrushed.  Willing to lean however.

2.  When someone mentions "Raytheon" lighting, what do they mean?  I only know about Raytheon Aerospace.

Sure to have more questions as I go, thanks.

Merrittk54 

Offline Decoman

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Re: Took the Leap!
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2018, 02:47:05 pm »
I wouldn't bother using the Enterprise Refit model as practice for airbrush. That is not to say it has to take a long time to learn to use an airbush, I eh sort of learned it really quickly, focusing on practicing at first.

Presumably, the issues you will run into using an airbrush at the beginning is:

0) Learn to clean your airbrush and to keep it clean, or it will be unfun.
1) "Orange skin" result. A pebbly surface, because of either overspray, or paint drying prematurely when spraying, or perhaps airbrushing on too many layers of paint. You can try sanding gently the dried paint, to knock down an uneven painted surface, but best to get it right the first time.
2) Ending up bending the needle (have a spare one ready)
3) Having inadequate venting for doing airbrushing in the first place
4) Ending up using masking tape but having too strong adhesive, resulting in chipping the airbrushed paint (reduce strength of adhesive first)
« Last Edit: August 24, 2018, 02:54:47 pm by Decoman »

Offline Decoman

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Re: Took the Leap!
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2018, 02:51:43 pm »
I would start using an airbrush if I were you, but you would have to take the time to practice, and try put your magnum opus on hold until you know what you are doing.

Acrylic paint is presumably much less toxic than enamel paint.

I personally am fond of using putty and sanding seams flush. If adding lighting, you risk having light bleed through the model, which would make it look very bad, so you would have to arrange for some kind of light blocking solution, to avoid LED lights being seen through the white plastic, when the LED light is only supposed to be seen through the clear parts.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2018, 02:53:33 pm by Decoman »

Offline Guns Akimbo

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Re: Took the Leap!
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2018, 03:29:36 pm »
The best way I've learned basic airbrushing skills is to practice using distilled water on a flattened brown paper bag. Your airbrush won't require cleaning after every use, and when the paper bag dries out it can be used again.

This is great way to master spraying fundamental patterns such as lines, dots, circles, etc. without using up expensive paints and thinners.

Offline Merrittk54

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Re: Took the Leap!
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2018, 08:05:00 pm »
Thanks for the replies, Decoman & Guns Akimbo!  So, no joy on the decals, eh?  I take from your responses that a well-done decal job is no match for airbrushed finish.  Great suggestions.  I'm quite a ways from that point in the build so I have time to consider it.  Willing to have a go at it.

I'm still curious just how a decal job looks on this model.  Has anyone got pics they are willing to share?

Merrittk54


Offline Spencer

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Re: Took the Leap!
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2018, 10:37:31 pm »
The best way I've learned basic airbrushing skills is to practice using distilled water on a flattened brown paper bag. Your airbrush won't require cleaning after every use, and when the paper bag dries out it can be used again.

This is great way to master spraying fundamental patterns such as lines, dots, circles, etc. without using up expensive paints and thinners.

^^ This. I did something similar to learn airbrushing basics. It's a skill that's easier to learn than you think and you'll wonder why you
didn't do it sooner ...

I believe these are some pics of the aztek decals applied.
http://www.modelermagic.com/?p=27487

I've not attempted the 1:350 Refit myself, and you should definitely practice on something smaller and/or simpler, maybe the 1:537 Refit or Reliant kits.

Raytheon lighting is when you intentionally let light shine through the plastic and let it "light up" spots on the model. Example here.
https://jazzmansenterpriserefit1.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/lets-talk-raytheon/

It's hard to get it right, but it deals with some of the spotlights on the Refit that are impossible to actually have at this scale.


Spencer

Offline Merrittk54

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Re: Took the Leap!
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2018, 09:04:56 am »
Thank you, Spencer.  That clears up a lot of confusion! ;)

 




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