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Author Topic: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...  (Read 265 times)

Offline Spencer

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Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« on: August 24, 2018, 10:57:39 pm »
Hey everyone,

My source for Duplicolor primers has dried up. My local Advance doesn't carry their primers anymore and the nearest NAPA or O'Reilly is
about a 2 hour drive away.

I'm willing to use Krylon again. My somewhat local Hobby Lobby sometimes has Tamiya primer in stock as well as the liquid surface primer.
I've thought about trying to thin liquid primer with lacquer thinner and give it a go. I know several folks swear by Tamiya.

I've seen/heard good things about Stynylrez primer and I am interested.
How easy does this stuff spray? Does it need any reducing? Surface texture? Sandability (important)? Adhesion? etc.
What can go over it? I know it's water based acrylic polyurethane ...

Besides Krylon, there won't be any cheap solution for me, either through base cost or shipping, so I'd like to get some opinions before I drop any cash ...


Spencer
« Last Edit: August 24, 2018, 11:00:56 pm by Spencer »

Offline TK Iain

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2018, 04:44:44 am »
Hi Spencer.

I swear by Stynylrez primer now and use it exclusively on any build I have. It's also remarked as Ultimate Primer here in the UK but it is the exact same stuff. I have never thinned it before usage and it lays down superbly whether via airbrush or hand painted on. It self levels and dries very quickly and can be sanded straight away once dried. It recommends using a large needle and between 20-30 psi but TBH I have never had any problems with the standard 0.5 needle I usually use and the higher pressure does help.

I would give it a go.
Iain

Offline RossW

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2018, 10:00:56 am »
Hi Spencer.

I swear by Stynylrez primer now and use it exclusively on any build I have. It's also remarked as Ultimate Primer here in the UK but it is the exact same stuff. I have never thinned it before usage and it lays down superbly whether via airbrush or hand painted on. It self levels and dries very quickly and can be sanded straight away once dried. It recommends using a large needle and between 20-30 psi but TBH I have never had any problems with the standard 0.5 needle I usually use and the higher pressure does help.

I would give it a go.
Seconded. Now my fav primer.

Offline starsiegeplayer

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2018, 04:25:33 pm »
I have had good results with krylon primer.  Boyd has had many good things to say about generic Wall-mart brand primer.

I like Tamiya primer but it is expensive.

Offline Spencer

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2018, 11:59:26 pm »
Thanks for the replies folks :)

I can use Krylon, I just find it needs more work to get the same results as the Duplicolor, but I'll use it in a pinch.
I'm pretty sure the cheap Walmart stuff (HomeShades) was discontinued. I don't recall seeing it in the store and their website only has one can listed.

I'm thinking about trying the liquid surface primer, or decanting Tamiya to maximize efficiency, if I need a lacquer solution. I might also occasionally bite the bullet and get more Duplicolor and Tamiya online.

I had a disaster with Vallejo primer. That stuff is absolute crap to sand and peeled way too easily for me. I'll only use it as a top color coat because it's Light Ghost Gray.

I'm now rather settled on getting some Stynylrez, but I just found out that it can't freeze or it's ruined, so I'll need to test it out and order some more before winter. I've had stuff shipped to me frozen from the cold.  ::)

My trusty Paasche Talon airbrush should handle this stuff. It's an oddball needle at 0.38mm, but its paint nozzle is bigger than most and I usually spray around 22-23 PSI anyway for general coverage.

Spencer
« Last Edit: August 26, 2018, 12:05:35 am by Spencer »

Offline simi

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2018, 11:16:18 am »
I've used all of the above primers (and had horrible sanding issues with vallejo primer as well) and by far the best is stynylrez.  Not the cheapest, but so far the best.  I occasionally use duplicolor as well and haven't really had any issues.

Cheers!

Simi
As a software architect, I'm pretty darn good.  As someone with knowledge of building things in the real world, well, I'm a software architect.

Offline scottminium

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2018, 06:00:36 pm »
Love Stynylrez.  No reducing, sprays straight out of the bottle.
"I rather believe that time is a companion who goes with us on the journey, and reminds us to cherish every moment... because they'll never come again."

Offline Galaxy_Stranger

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2018, 01:58:26 am »
I wouldn't really compare Stynylrez to Krylon or Duplicolor as it's a water based acrylic.

Stynylrez is incredible.  It's SUPER forgiving.  I wish they sold it in primary colors and I'd just use it as base coat.  My only complaint would be that it's thick and dries - like all water based paints.  But I've shot it through a Sotar 20/20.  But if you're planning on using anything other than water based paints, I'd sooner use straight Testors enamels as a primer.

Duplicolor is almost all, if not completely lacquer based.  My favorite is the 32oz Paint Shop line, which is automotive lacquer aimed at car restorations.  Right now, you can get it on Amazon for $22.99 free shipping with Prime - way cheaper by volume than just about anything out there.  The Paint Shop primer is excellent - especially if you're shooting lacquer base coat.

The only primer I'd really stay away from is Vallejo.  Not a big fan.  I saw someone demonstrate how it doesn't bond to the styrene at all.  It just covers it like a plastic cover.

Offline Spencer

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2018, 10:24:04 pm »
The only primer I'd really stay away from is Vallejo.  Not a big fan.  I saw someone demonstrate how it doesn't bond to the styrene at all.  It just covers it like a plastic cover.

Pretty sure I saw the same video. Stynylrez is acrylic polyurethane, so it's in the same family as Vallejo primer, but I agree that Stynylrez runs circles around Vallejo.
I find that it just does a better job of adhering and taking abuse.


Duplicolor is almost all, if not completely lacquer based.  My favorite is the 32oz Paint Shop line, which is automotive lacquer aimed at car restorations.  Right now, you can get it on Amazon for $22.99 free shipping with Prime - way cheaper by volume than just about anything out there.  The Paint Shop primer is excellent - especially if you're shooting lacquer base coat.

I still love Duplicolor, and will use it when I can. I have thought about using the big cans of primer and am willing to try it. According to the label I saw you thin it with acetone if needed and use a spray
gun at 30-40 PSI.

Care to tell us how you thin/spray it with an airbrush?


Spencer

Offline Galaxy_Stranger

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2018, 11:05:17 pm »
I just thin it with lacquer thinner from the hardware store, though I did buy a gallon of Duplicolors lacquer thinner just to see if it was any better - haven't tried it yet.  I'm sure, like anything else, you'll have to play with it to get it the way you like it.  It's fantastically durable.  Just remember to be thorough when mixing the can - make sure you rake up the bottom real well.

I'm reticent to use Acetone to thin it because styrene sheet is so delicate to begin with.

The greatest benefit is that 32oz is damn near a lifetime supply.

Offline Spencer

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2018, 11:23:48 pm »
Thanks for that!

I just saw the bit about acetone on Amazon's label view and it threw me off a little. I suspected lacquer thinner would work as well.
Might pick some up and give it a try when I get the chance ...


Offline Galaxy_Stranger

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2018, 12:02:14 am »
Yeah, Lacquer automotive paints weren't "reduced" - they were thinned with lacquer thinner.  Acetone is everywhere in many solvent based paints.  You can even use lacquer thinner on enamels.

And remember to protect yourself.  These are hard-core automotive paints.  You don't want to breathe in fumes and particulates from ANY paint system - even water based paints - but when you hit lacquers and urethanes, you've reached a new tier in wanting cancer.  I shoot these in my office with a $35 mask in front of a 200 CFM fan that shoots everything out the window.  To be honest, I think it's a little overkill because I'm not fogging up the place but I'd much rather take precautions, plus it makes enamels easier to deal with.

Oh, also the "Primer Gray" isn't gray at all.  But it's a perfect match for '70s era F-14 CAG paint jobs.

Offline Spencer

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Re: Stynylrez Primer, Tamiya Primer ...
« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2018, 12:21:28 am »
Yeah, Lacquer automotive paints weren't "reduced" - they were thinned with lacquer thinner.  Acetone is everywhere in many solvent based paints.  You can even use lacquer thinner on enamels.

And remember to protect yourself.  These are hard-core automotive paints.  You don't want to breathe in fumes and particulates from ANY paint system - even water based paints - but when you hit lacquers and urethanes, you've reached a new tier in wanting cancer.  I shoot these in my office with a $35 mask in front of a 200 CFM fan that shoots everything out the window.  To be honest, I think it's a little overkill because I'm not fogging up the place but I'd much rather take precautions, plus it makes enamels easier to deal with.

Oh, also the "Primer Gray" isn't gray at all.  But it's a perfect match for '70s era F-14 CAG paint jobs.

No worries man ... I have a proper respirator I use whenever I'm spraying. Filter cartridges for water based acrylics and OV cartridges with particulate pre-filters for solvent based paints.
I also have a booth with fans that vent everything outside. My grandfather use to paint cars and I was taught very early on just what paint can do to you.

I usually used branded thinners for enamels and clean them up with mineral spirits, but on occasion, I have used lacquer thinner to good effect.


 




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