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Author Topic: Trying Stynylrez primer (TESTED)  (Read 410 times)

Offline Galaxy_Stranger

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Re: Trying Stynylrez primer (TESTED)
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2018, 09:31:16 pm »
I own the Badger mixer and it's exceptional.  Prior to that, I mixed the bottle with a toothpick.

Ball bearings are great to have in the bottle when you shake them once in a while, but they're not a substitute for mixing the paint completely just before use.

Offline Spencer

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Re: Trying Stynylrez primer (TESTED)
« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2018, 10:06:45 pm »
I would think glass beads to be better if you'd want to go that way.
Metal beads could rust over time if they weren't stainless.

I made my own mixer using an old electric toothbrush and some music wire, but will probably get a proper deal at some point.

I'd also recommend Tamiya's metal stirring sticks. Lots of other uses for those other than just stirring paint.

Offline DizWhiz

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Re: Trying Stynylrez primer (TESTED)
« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2018, 07:52:23 pm »
Glad others have found success with badger primers they're all I use now. The only time I've had an issue was recently light blocking my clear enterprise D kit took several coats. Not sure if it was my technique or what.
-Dave

Offline Galaxy_Stranger

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Re: Trying Stynylrez primer (TESTED)
« Reply #18 on: October 11, 2018, 04:54:18 pm »
Oh, I wouldn't use it for light blocking.  It's nice and thick, but water based paints tend not to be very opaque.  At that point, I'd use an enamel or something.

Offline DizWhiz

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Re: Trying Stynylrez primer (TESTED)
« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2018, 06:15:35 pm »
Oh, I wouldn't use it for light blocking.  It's nice and thick, but water based paints tend not to be very opaque.  At that point, I'd use an enamel or something.

This I learned the hardest of ways! 4 heavy coats later and I can finally start to lay down a base coat  ;)
-Dave

 




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