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Author Topic: Merrittk54's Enterprise 1/350 Refit Build  (Read 504 times)

Offline Merrittk54

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Re: Merrittk54's Enterprise 1/350 Refit Build
« Reply #15 on: September 24, 2018, 03:57:49 pm »
Thanks for the suggestions.  I saw a thread from Neil Smith and he tackled the window situation differently.  I may try to get in touch with him and ask about it.

Pressing on!

-Merrittk54

Offline CrowTRobot

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Re: Merrittk54's Enterprise 1/350 Refit Build
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2018, 07:23:38 am »
1.  At what point in the build process did you apply the Envirotex? Before or after assembly?  Before or after paint?  Did you have to mask it?

After light-blocking the interior but before assembly & exterior painting. I did have to mask each window, but I used the Orbital Drydock masking set which included pre-cut masks for all the windows.

2.  So the Scotch tape doesn't stick to the cured Envirotex?

Nope! A little tape adhesive remained stuck to some of the windows, but a gentle sanding took care of that. That's another plus: you can sand & polish the resin windows once they're cured.

3.  Did you use this technique on every window (except for the officer's lounge and arboretum, of course)?

Right. For the officer's lounge, arboretum, and rec-deck windows I used very thin sheets of clear styrene. Everything else is resin.

4.  Is it brushed on or poured on?

I "dabbed" it on using a small bit a stretched sprue. I mixed small amounts of resin in a tiny cup and transferred droplets of it into each window using the sprue. This gave me good control over the process. A paint brush or toothpick would be prone to adding air bubbles to the resin. You want to use something smooth to avoid picking up air. I ended up with some bubbles anyway despite my best efforts, but whenever that happened I was able to coax them out using the same bit of stretched sprue.

It's not a quick process, but I think the end results are worth it. The 2-part resin has a finite working time with once it's mixed, so I mixed only small amounts and worked small sections of the model in any given session. For example, in one session I filled the left & right dorsal windows, and in another I did the left & right secondary hull windows. If you break it up this way it makes it more manageable and less tedious.

The only real trouble I had was on the saucer rim windows. If you look at them closely you'll see that the sensor band grooves run right into the window openings. The Scotch tape had a hard time sealing these areas, and as a result some of the resin leaked out into the grooves. I had to clean the cured resin out these areas using scribing tools and gentle sanding.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2018, 09:59:38 am by CrowTRobot »

Offline Merrittk54

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Re: Merrittk54's Enterprise 1/350 Refit Build
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2018, 09:10:51 am »
Thank you CrowT.

So, when you sand the windows after the resin hardens, I presume they will have an opaque look to them.  Is that what to expect?  Doesn't bother me if they do so long as the light gets through.

Offline CrowTRobot

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Re: Merrittk54's Enterprise 1/350 Refit Build
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2018, 09:58:05 am »
After sanding with fine-grit paper the windows will have a frosted appearance. You can either polish them or just leave them and let your gloss coat shine them up. Light passes through them easily .

 




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