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Author Topic: Advice concerning Light Blocking Problem  (Read 237 times)

Offline coreysan

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Advice concerning Light Blocking Problem
« on: March 23, 2019, 10:53:28 pm »
I'm installing yellow LEDs inside my model, but the light bleeds a little through the plastic to the exterior.
The exterior should be painted white, so if I touch up the exterior with black to
fix the bleeding, it would make covering with white that much harder.

Any tips or advice?



Offline TK Iain

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Re: Advice concerning Light Blocking Problem
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2019, 03:16:57 am »
Hi.

Personally I would light block on the inner surface of a kit - it can be as thick as required and if it gets messy it doesn't matter as no-one will see the inside once the kit is complete anyway so you can go mad.

More experienced members will be along but TBH I have found going over black can be extremely difficult depending on the base colour (if that happens to be white then forget it IMO). A good primer (grey?) on top of the black can certainly help but then too much paint - light blocking layer, primer then base coat can cover up any fine detail on the surface.

Hope my rambling helps a wee bit.
Iain

Offline simi

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Re: Advice concerning Light Blocking Problem
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2019, 11:31:23 am »
Hi.

Personally I would light block on the inner surface of a kit - it can be as thick as required and if it gets messy it doesn't matter as no-one will see the inside once the kit is complete anyway so you can go mad.

More experienced members will be along but TBH I have found going over black can be extremely difficult depending on the base colour (if that happens to be white then forget it IMO). A good primer (grey?) on top of the black can certainly help but then too much paint - light blocking layer, primer then base coat can cover up any fine detail on the surface.

Hope my rambling helps a wee bit.

Like Iain said, interior is the way to go here.  Here's what I've learned when light blocking:

1. spray the interior of the model.  Black for best blocking.  Use cheapest paint (usually a spray primer or something but it doesn't really matter).  I do this in layers until I can put an LED flushly against the interior plastic of the model and not (or BARELY) see the led on bleed through the other side

2. If you want the light source to show through multiple windows, or just want to more evenly light the entire interior - cover the interior with a layer of white (again, cheap primer).  This will cause the light to reflect/bounce round a bit more than the black.  Plus - it's another blocking coat on top of the black.

3. I almost always prime the exterior.  So this will help too - although usually at this point it's light-leak free and the primer is for ..well...what primer is generally used for!


Cheers!

Simi
As a software architect, I'm pretty darn good.  As someone with knowledge of building things in the real world, well, I'm a software architect.

Offline coreysan

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Re: Advice concerning Light Blocking Problem
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2019, 11:04:21 pm »
Thank you to both of you who responded. Great input.
The LED I'm working on goes in a hole that I've drilled out, and I light-blocked
as much of the interior as I could. I even stuck a brush down into the hole and
applied enamel black down in there.

There's still a few tiny areas that bleed through.

Should I just stick with interior blocking until I manage to get it right? I even applied black enamel
to the sides of the LED itself, which helped, but didn't solve things 100%.

 




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